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The Lead

Achieving ambitious STEM objectives efficiently and economically

March 25, 2015 9:41 am | by Steven Gifford, AIA, Principal, Perkins Eastman | Articles | Comments

Is it possible to design a learning and research center that maximizes efficiency while accelerating interdisciplinary discovery that often happens within informal spaces outside classrooms and labs? Colleges and universities are recognizing the need to provide informal research and learning places in addition to flexible labs and classrooms.

Core facilities respond to changing scientific research needs

March 23, 2015 10:53 am | by Hal Spiers, LEED BD+C, Associate, Payette | Articles | Comments

Adaptability and flexibility are key ingredients to successful lab planning and design. As the...

Immersive learning at Clemson Univ.’s Watt Family Innovation Center

March 18, 2015 11:47 am | by Stacy Robinson, AIA, CDT, LEED AP, Senior Associate and Floyd Cline, AIA, CDT, LEED AP, Associate, Perkins+Will | Articles | Comments

Academic institutions are seeing significant shifts in pedagogy in response to advances in...

Designing labs for multiple generations

March 17, 2015 1:33 pm | by Lindsay Hock, Editor | Articles | Comments

Science is evolving: It’s becoming more translational and multidisciplinary in nature. Just as...

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Small, fast and successful: A case for lab renovation

March 12, 2015 9:37 am | by Barbara A. Carpenter, Associate Principal, Tsoi/Kobus and Associates | Articles | Comments

For so many clients, building new ground-up lab space isn’t an option. From an economic standpoint, the duration of new construction doesn’t serve the immediate need; and often, an appropriate site is unavailable. In our dense urban centers, the desire for researchers to be co-located with their peers and their heroes, makes the competition for space a real challenge.

February 2015 Issue of Laboratory Design Newsletter

February 27, 2015 11:19 am | by Laboratory Design Newsletter | Digital Editions | Comments

This month's issue of Laboratory Design Newsletter features articles on sustainability in labs, new methods for optimizing flexibility in research environments, commissioning, how to be a great first-time user representative, liquid-cooled sustainability and more. The issue also includes news notes, new products and new projects.

Reading between the lines: A look at the leap from BSL-2 to BSL-3

February 25, 2015 11:00 am | by Alexander P. Clinton, AIA, LEED AP BD+C, CDT, Senior Associate, Senior Project Manager, Perkins+Will, Houston | Articles | Comments

Without substantial experience in Biosafety Level 3 work it can be easily underestimated just how much is involved in designing a BSL-3 facility. Design guidelines such as the Center of Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)’s Biosafety in Microbiological and Biomedical Laboratories (BMBL) list BSL-3/ABSL-3 design criteria that may appear as a deceptively simple upgrade to BSL-2; a good bit of reading between the lines is needed.

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Seven reasons to attend the Lab Design Conference

February 25, 2015 9:35 am | by Lindsay Hock, Editor | News | Comments

The 2015 Laboratory Design Conference is open for registration. Your opportunity to learn, network and participate in discussions about current and future trends in lab design is coming to Atlanta, April 27-29th. The countdown to the conference has begun, and here’s a countdown of reasons why you should be there.

Commissioning for the greater building good

February 23, 2015 9:23 am | by Lindsay Hock, Editor | Articles | Comments

A buzzword thrown around in lab design is commissioning. But truly how important is this process to meeting end goals? My answer: extremely. Building commissioning is the process of verifying, in new construction, all building subsystems to achieve an owner’s project requirements as intended by the building owner and as designed by the building architects and engineers.

The core of flexibility

February 20, 2015 3:50 pm | by Ronald Blanchard, AIA, LEED, AP BD+C, Associate, Payette | Articles | Comments

Flexibility in research labs has been a universal goal in recent years. Components that contribute to flexibility include lab casework systems and utility connections, zoning specific areas of a building and programming. In many situations, flexibility is solely focused on the solutions possible within the typical lab area vs. a more holistic look at the larger view of the research ecosystem.

Interdisciplinary science in the liberal arts tradition

February 20, 2015 3:21 pm | by Matthew Cotton, AIA, Principal and Sarah Johnson, LEED AP, Perkins Eastman, Boston | Articles | Comments

Many higher education institutions are struggling to meet a broad spectrum of facilities recapitalization needs that return the greatest benefit to the campus. These needs include capital improvements to flexible facilities that support contemporary learning and create an interactive, collaborative experience for the broad and evolving campus community.

Sustainability in labs

February 20, 2015 10:44 am | by Evan Weremeychik, AIA, LEED AP, Principal, Perkins Eastman | Articles | Comments

The typical lab building is an energy hog. These buildings house complex environments heavy on equipment and infrastructure and are regulated by strict code requirements. While the basics of green architecture create a strong backbone for sustainable lab environments, a truly successful green lab strategy strives to contribute to the occupants’ comfort while addressing a need for constant change, heavy energy usage and waste regulations.

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New methods for optimizing flexibility in research environments

February 20, 2015 10:24 am | by Randy Kray, AIA, OAA, MAA, HOK | Articles | Comments

How do we design labs for future uses that haven’t been defined? Today’s interdisciplinary approach to scientific research requires synergistic, extremely flexible lab spaces that accommodate the needs of diverse users. To support the growing convergence of scientific disciplines and quickly evolving technologies, organizations must provide flexible research environments that allow for efficient short- and long-term changes.

Should your project undergo commissioning?

February 20, 2015 9:58 am | by David Wilson, PE, LEED AP, SSOE Group | Articles | Comments

Commissioning has become an increasingly common practice. It’s essentially a formalized functional performance test of an entire building’s systems—a process that validates, verifies and documents the builder’s project objectives have been fully met. Simply put, commissioning independently confirms newly built, renovated or existing buildings work the way they’re supposed to.

30+ architecture school interested in NCARB licensure initiative

February 20, 2015 9:49 am | News | Comments

A proposed framework for an alternative, integrated path to becoming an architect, which could culminate in students earning their architectural license at graduation, has drawn interest from more than 30 institutions that offer accredited architectural degree programs, the National Council of Architectural Registration Boards (NCARB) announced.

Institute for Sustainable Infrastructure, Skanska announce partnership

February 20, 2015 9:47 am | News | Comments

The Institute for Sustainable Infrastructure (ISI) and Skanska announced a new U.S. partnership. With the partnership, Skanska has committed to aligning the delivery of heavy infrastructure civil projects with efforts to ensure the social, economic and environmental sustainability of the communities where they are built.

SmithGroupJJR, River Architects selected to design UW-LA Crosse science facility

February 20, 2015 9:44 am | News | Comments

The new $82 million instructional science facility at Univ. of Wisconsin-La Crosse will be designed by a collaboration of national architecture and engineering firm SmithGroupJJR in association with local partner River Architects. This project will provide a complete replacement of Cowley Hall, the current UW-La Crosse science instruction facility built in 1965.

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R&D Magazine Announces the 2015 Laboratory of the Year Winners

February 20, 2015 9:16 am | by Lindsay Hock, Editor | News | Comments

In its 49th year, the Laboratory of the Year Awards continue to recognize excellence in research laboratory design, planning and construction. Judging for this year’s competition took place on Thursday, February 19th and was conducted by a blue-ribbon panel of laboratory architects, engineers, equipment manufacturers, researchers and the editors of R&D Magazine and Laboratory Design Newsletter.

Leslie Sims joins EYP as science expert

February 19, 2015 5:05 pm | News | Comments

EYP announced Leslie Sims recently joined the firm as a Science Expert, supporting EYP’s nationally recognized higher education, government and corporate sectors. For more than 30 years, she has been a widely acknowledged leader in innovative architecture for science, engineering and technology, and is nationally recognized for the management, planning and design of a wide variety of lab spaces.

Arup chooses Crow to head up healthcare engineering in Houston

February 19, 2015 5:02 pm | News | Comments

Arup, a multidisciplinary engineering and consulting firm, announced Carl Crow, PE, ASHRAE HBDP, has joined the firm in its Houston location as an associate principal mechanical engineer with a focus on healthcare and research facilities. Crow will be responsible for leading and growing the healthcare/health science design capabilities in the firm’s Houston office.

Treanor Architects welcomes Patrick Jones to S&T team

February 19, 2015 5:00 pm | News | Comments

Treanor Architects is pleased to announce the hiring of Patrick Jones to the firm’s S&T team. With 15 years of experience in architecture, and a specialized focus on science and lab facilities, Jones adds depth to the firm’s capabilities.

How to be a great first-time user representative

February 19, 2015 4:57 pm | by J. Erik Mollo-Christensen, AIA, Tsoi/Kobus & Associates Inc. | Articles | Comments

Do you have what it takes to provide input for the design of a new building? Good researchers and good user representatives often share similar qualities. User representatives are the primary link between the designers and the functional requirements of a lab project. They provide the expertise the design team needs to shape the general planning parameters.

The green cycle: Sustainable research findings create sustainable research facilities

February 19, 2015 4:31 pm | by Kevin Brettmann, Director, S&T, JE Dunn Construction | Articles | Comments

The idea of green and sustainable building isn’t a new one. In fact, the idea of using sustainable materials for building has been around for generations. But until recently, the goal of achieving LEED Platinum certification was retained for buildings that weren’t massively energy dependent.

Long Island Univ. Arnold and Marie Schwartz College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences Laboratories (Institute for Pharmaceutical Analysis)

February 13, 2015 4:12 pm | News | Comments

Working with an ambitious timeline of just under one year, Perkins+Will has reinvented two facilities as new pharmacology labs for Long Island Univ. Located on the top floor of a three-story building in downtown Brooklyn, N.Y., the 6,000-sf labs expands Long Island Univ.’s position in the area of graduate education and research by creating an advanced analytical lab.

Forensic Services and Coroner's Complex captures AIA Award of Merit

February 13, 2015 4:03 pm | by Laboratory Design Newsletter | News | Comments

Toronto’s Forensic Services and Coroner’s Complex (FSCC) has received an Award of Merit from the 2014 American Institute of Architects Justice Facility Review. Stantec Architecture, in association with MWL Architects, served as the Proponent Design Architects and Architects of Record on the project.

Liquid-cooled sustainability

February 13, 2015 3:27 pm | by Lindsay Hock, Editor | Articles | Comments

Five years ago, it was revolutionary to put chilled beam heating and cooling in a lab; but now this hydronic form of sustainable HVAC is increasingly common in modern, sustainable lab settings. Chilled beams are operated where pipes of water are passed through a beam, or heat exchanger, either integrated into standard suspended ceiling systems or suspended a short distance from the ceiling of a lab.

Cleanroom Workstation

February 13, 2015 3:13 pm | by Leatherwood Plastics | Product Releases | Comments

Leatherwood Plastics offers benches and workstations tailored to suit clean process and pharmaceutical manufacturing needs. The Megasonic Wafer Cleaning Bench is a manually operated, acid cleaning tool constructed of polypropylene and has a footprint of 60 in wide by 37 in deep by 93.5 in high. The bench has a portioned sloped, sump area separating process and QDR waste and their drains.

Adjustable Cleanroom Workstation

February 13, 2015 3:09 pm | by Palbam Class | Product Releases | Comments

The cleanroom height-adjustable workstation from Palbam Class allows the operator to quickly change table height to ensure a comfortable, ergonomic work environment. The automatic height-adjustable tables are manufactured from clean, non-corrosive materials. The table top and leveler base are manufactured from stainless steel 304L with electro-polished finish.

Ductless Fume Hoods

February 13, 2015 3:05 pm | by Air Science USA | Product Releases | Comments

Air Science USA’s Purair 20 ductless fume hood is designed to provide operator protection when using hazardous substances. A face velocity at 100 fpm ensures containment of fumes, and an alarm will alert the operator when the airflow falls to an unacceptable level. All mechanisms in the head section of the Purair 20 are on the clean side of the filter, preventing contamination.

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