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Sustainable Laboratory Design and Construction

June 9, 2014 | by Tim Studt, Editorial Director | Comments

Over the past decade, it has become readily apparent that the global environment is increasingly sensitive to human activity. The effects of global warming, increasing energy costs, dramatic climate changes and shortages of raw materials, potable water and food strain the global community.

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Laboratory Design Connection

Cool solutions

October 20, 2014 2:05 pm | by Lindsay Hock, Managing Editor | Comments

In the ultra-low-temperature (ULT) freezer market there’s a continued focus on sample protection. As users store priceless samples, they need to have ULT freezers that provide them with quick recovery and uniformity after door openings. However, for most users, the trend is pointing to energy efficiency and cost, as ULT freezers cost as much to operate in a year as an average American household, according to the Univ. of California, Davis.

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Designing a LEED Platinum science facility

October 20, 2014 2:00 pm | by Rene Rotolo, AVP Campus Planning, Lehman College and Robert Goodwin, Design Director and Principal, Breeze Glazer, Sustainability Leader and Senior Associate and Julio Colon, Project Architect and Senior Associate, Perkins+Will | Comments

There’s a common perception that pursuing LEED certification for most building types is difficult and cost prohibitive. This perception only grows when considering the highest level of LEED certification, Platinum, in relation to lab design, which is considered one of the most complex building types.

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Mobile design station and teaching wall

October 20, 2014 11:52 am | by Diana D. Glawe, PhD, PE, LEED AP | Comments

A versatile, robust and mobile design station can be economically constructed by integrating off-the-shelf components with a clever custom framework. Ten such design stations are performing wonderfully in the new Center for the Sciences and Innovation at Trinity Univ. Each unit supports the engineering design process from brainstorming and prototype design through construction and testing.

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Effective collaboration spaces

October 9, 2014 2:46 pm | by Elizabeth Gibb, AIA | Comments

Innovative thinking drives all scientific research. Scientists require spaces that allow them the freedom to work in a variety of ways. Designing lab buildings is a complicated endeavor for any design team. To have a successful project the architect and scientist must learn to communicate and speak each other’s language.

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Lab synergistics enhance energy efficiency

October 9, 2014 2:24 pm | by Author: Andrea Love, AIA, LEED AP, Payette | Comments

Many energy-efficiency strategies are often viewed in isolation, not allowing projects to realize their full potential. When viewed as part of the cooling system, the integration of a high-performance envelope with exterior shading is able to decrease the size of equipment needed.

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Optimizing lab design for rapidly evolving science

October 9, 2014 2:05 pm | by Richard L. Kobus, FAIA, FACHA, Senior Principal and Stephen Palumbo, AIA, LEED AP, Associate, Tsoi/Kobus & Associates | Comments

The Jackson Laboratory (JAX), based in Bar Harbor, Maine, operates at the forefront of genomic research. Tsoi/Kobus & Associates (TK&A)’s challenge as co-designer of The Jackson Laboratory for Genomic Medicine (JAX GM) in Farmington, Conn., was to ensure that the research environment can respond quickly to shifts in research focus that are necessary to support these advances in personalized medicine.

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You need to move in when?

October 9, 2014 12:43 pm | by Cathryn E. Horan, AIA, LEED AP, PhiloWilke Partnership | Comments

Research labs by their nature are complex. They involve careful and time-consuming consideration throughout planning, design and construction to ensure spaces meet quality and testing requirements, and are flexible enough to meet the demands of various users without enduring the costs of repeated renovations.

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True flexibility furthers science

October 9, 2014 12:07 pm | by Evan Weremeychik, AIA, LEED AP, Perkins Eastman | Comments

Rapid technological advances, scientific leaps and the influences of modern culture are some factors that have many institutions scrambling to update or replace outdated research facilities. Concurrent with this shift in research and how it’s conducted is a move toward collaborative, multidisciplinary research. Leveraging the cross-pollination of ideas between diverse groups often leads to extraordinary results.

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Liquid labs: Designing for collaboration

October 9, 2014 11:45 am | by Jinhee Lee, AAIA, Carlos Perez-Rubio, LEED AP BD+C, and Ken Mohr, Principal, HERA | Comments

Interdisciplinary collaboration has become paramount to academic and corporate-based research. Collaboration is likely to occur only in an environment that enables and enhances interaction among researchers. Departing from the traditional lab environment, a “liquid lab” design maximizes the adaptability of a space, the fluidity of the changing research and the researcher’s access to collaborative space.

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Structuring success in the science and research market

October 9, 2014 11:26 am | by Derek Johnson, LEED AP, and Bill Harris, AIA, LEED AP BD+C, Perkins+Will | Comments

An emerging trend in delivering science and research buildings is “developer-led, build-to-suit construction” leased back to the corporate or institutional tenant. While offering many attractive features, this delivery model inevitably creates tension around design, schedule, budget and cost allocations between the core/shell (C/S) and tenant improvement (TI) projects.

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The science of collaboration

October 8, 2014 4:25 pm | by Mark Kranz, AIA, LEED AP BD+C ,and Adam Denmark, AIA, LEED AP BD+C, SmithGroupJJR | Comments

Lab design must begin with a clear understanding of the research mission it will support. The underlying philosophy of the institution is a critical element of the lab design brief, informing every decision including the placement of interaction zones that foster innovation.

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How collaboration increases performance and reduces cost

October 6, 2014 1:15 pm | by James Crispino, Francis Cauffmann | Comments

The Cord Blood Center (CBC) at State Univ. of New York’s Upstate Medical Univ. is a small but highly specialized lab facility for stem cell research. It’s one of only a handful of similar facilities in the U.S. built exclusively as a cord blood lab. The building was financed by a $15 million grant from the State of New York that covered its design, construction and fit-out, including costly and sophisticated equipment.

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Meeting sustainability goals in an energy-charged world

October 6, 2014 11:58 am | by Kathryn Tyson, AIA, LEED AP BD+C | Comments

Wisconsin Energy Institute (WEI) kicked off its new building project design on July 10, 2009, with a goal setting session. What resulted was a group of over 200 “stakeholders” in true Madison, Wisc., fashion, who realized their chance to be heard and address their goals for the WEI.

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Back to the future: A retrospective look forward at lab planning

September 29, 2014 2:38 pm | by Mark Paskanik, AIA, NCARB, LEED AP BD+C | Comments

Take a look at the picture. Would you believe that this could be the “lab of the future?” This is a picture of Thomas Edison’s lab in Fort Myers, Fla. Built in 1928, the lab contained a chemical processing area, machine shop, grinding room, office area and dark room and was used by Edison, along with Henry Ford and Harvey Firestone, to find an alternative source for rubber to reduce the nation’s dependence on foreign sources.

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Solving lab ventilation challenges with fabric HVAC air diffusion

September 10, 2014 11:33 am | by Nick Paschke, DuctSox Corp. | Comments

Most technicians have worked in a lab space with ventilation challenges. Poor lab ventilation can adversely affect air comfort and respiration for occupants, or affect research results via poor temperature control, uneven airflow and drafts. The main cause of ventilation challenges confronting labs today is the introduction of the HVAC supply air with such excessive velocities that the fume exhaust hood capture process is disrupted.

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